Mastery Learning - The Science Behind Hatch

Oct 18, 2019 11:06:03 PM / by Team Hatch posted in teaching, curriculum, learning outcomes, confidence, Mastery

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Excellence through deliberate practice

Aug 22, 2019 11:19:50 AM / by Team Hatch posted in learning outcomes, interns, confidence, independence

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We interviewed our intern, Rishi Mehta, about his experiences at Hatch. Rishi is now a skillful programmer and solving problems independently. As an intern, he is building exercises for other students to master Python. It turns out we might be building our future workforce.

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Q. When did you start with Hatch?
A: I started in grade 6.

Q: How long did you take courses?
A: For an entire school year. It's Hatch—it's fun.

Q: What was your best memory with a Hatch coach?
A: I was relatively new to coding—I was really stuck on what conditionals were. My teacher stayed after class to provide extra support—giving me reassurance that I could get anything solved and he was there to support.

Q: What was your favourite project you built with Hatch and why?
A: I have two. Torus: circles that go out and back in. And, Sunset Shadows: it looks really good. It is the best looking project in my humble opinion, and is very cool.

Q: What has Hatch offered in terms of options and choices for the future?
A: Before Hatch, I knew a little bit of Python, but after attending Hatch, I was very open and comfortable in learning other languages like Python, HTML, CSS.

Q: How did you get an internship at Hatch?
A: I contacted the founder of Hatch on LinkedIn. There happened to be an intern group starting soon—Peter said to show up at this time at this place and I was part of an intern group within 24 hours.

Q: What is it about Hatch's learning system that you think helps teach how to solve problems independently?
A: My favourite part, which helped me at the start, after classes, not only could I reach out to the teachers, but there is an explanation of the code for the base project but when you get to the challenges, you are on your own without any explanations. So you can get the support at the beginning, but when you want to push yourself, you can see what works and what doesn't work and figure it out yourself.

Q: What are you doing at Hatch in your internship?
A: I am doing a lot of things. I am helping translate JavaScript projects into Python. I am learning a lot about myself—about what I need and don't need help with. I am learning to ask fellow interns how to solve problems. I am learning more Python everyday—I have learned a ton everyday. I've helped to design the Leadership In Training program for teens who have learned with Hatch previously and now want to coach new students and become leaders.

Q: What do you think you have learned at Hatch about solving problems independently?
A: Learning Python on my own has taught me how to figure stuff out on my own. When you don't have people, how do you solve the problem—do you Google it—how do you research it?. You have to be smart with your time and time management. I have learned how to solve my coding problems through research even when there are no people there.

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Certified Teachers & Industry Experts - The Hatch Team

Aug 15, 2019 2:12:07 PM / by Team Hatch posted in child development, coding, programming, emmanuelle deaton, peter kuperman, teachers, Leanna Khan, Nathan Crawford, Lilah Gilman

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Hatch continues to lead the industry in building life skills through the language of coding. We are elevating the Hatch team with full time professional teachers (B.Ed, M.Ed, M.A. in Education) dedicated to the development of your child, the continual improvement of our lessons and to providing individualized support for each family. Hatch is also raising the bar by adding industry expertise. The additional know-how in the area of talent development will ensure Hatch continues to enable kids with the sought after skills that will allow them to succeed.

Meet the Hatch team ...

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Confidence to Succeed and Independence to Achieve

Aug 13, 2019 12:08:36 PM / by Team Hatch posted in learning outcomes, girls learning code, interns, confidence

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We interviewed our intern, Nina Khera, about her experiences at Hatch. Nina is now a skillful programmer and confident in her capabilities. As an intern, she has been writing programs that we are using and incorporating into our software. It turns out we might be building our future workforce
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Peter Kuperman: Why programming can be, but isn't necessarily, a math playground

Apr 18, 2019 8:11:19 PM / by Peter Kuperman posted in mathematics, math playground

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There is a common misconception that in order to be good at computer programming, an individual also needs to be good at math (meaning advanced math). That misconception has been hanging around now for decades. It's present in work and speeches dating back to at least the 1970s.

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Computer Programming and Pedagogy: Thoughts on Pedagogical Approaches

Mar 26, 2019 10:13:43 AM / by Emmanuelle Deaton posted in university, pedagogical approaches, K-12

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Pedagogical approaches matter a lot to the success of content delivery and content mastery. The idea of content mastery seems more and more antiquated as time goes by, human knowledge and experience grow, and computers become more powerful. Nonetheless, we should consider that content and content mastery still exist—even if they look different than they used to.

I believe that teachers want their students to be successful, and most define success as requiring a relatively high degree of independent mastery of skills, competencies, and knowledge. Wanting student success and knowing how to attain it, however, are two very different things. My mother, for instance, was educated in France and would not have agreed with my above assertion about teachers wanting student success. Her pedagogical experiences as a child in the French equivalent of our K-12 system, and later, as a student at the faculté de droit at l'université de Bordeaux and still yet later, at l'université de Montréal were based on nothing more sophisticated than the old fashioned idea of sink or swim. When, as a teenager, I floated the idea of attending a French university, she warned me that the approach to education was very different: that teachers did not spend very much (meaning, any) time on helping students learn. She explained that exams were designed to separate the wheat from the chaff: the vast majority of students were considered chaff, and a select group were considered wheat—the pedagogical approach (such as it was) reflected this belief. In many K-12 settings and universities this approach is still predominant. 

This type of teaching cannot continue in an R&D world. The more industry relies on research and development, the more it needs greater numbers of well-educated university graduates: people who can communicate complex thoughts clearly, who can read for meaning, who question, analyze, and draw conclusions while situating them in appropriate socio-economic and historical contexts. Doing so avoids myopia, moving us closer toward excellence in problem-solving.

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Spending time with professional teachers

Feb 25, 2019 1:22:27 PM / by Emmanuelle Deaton posted in teachers, learning outcomes, conference, acse, micro:bits, university of toronto, seneca

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This past Saturday was the 19th ACSE.net conference. That stands for the Association of Computer Science Educators. Peter Kuperman and I both attended. I was able to get away in the morning and be there for the whole day because Peter looked after our children in the AM; he joined me in the afternoon, leaving the children in the care of a trusted babysitter. We were so pleased to be at this conference. For us both, it was a real pleasure to connect and re-connect with professional teachers and educators whose passion is to achieve real learning outcomes in computer programming/computer science. In addition, it was wonderful to see some participation from CanCode recipients: Kids Code Jeunesse was there, although none of the other government funded organizations made it out.

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Curriculum and Technology

Jan 7, 2019 1:49:22 AM / by Emmanuelle Deaton and Peter Kuperman posted in learning, technology, computer programming, teaching, curriculum

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As the degree of technological change and human knowledge continues to grow by leaps and bounds, teachers and policy makers must grapple with several important questions:

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Coding Education Facts and Figures

Nov 12, 2018 5:45:53 PM / by Hatch Coding posted in STEAM, learning code, life-long learning

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One of the reasons we do what we do at Hatch is to keep coding relevant for our students. Here are some interesting Canadian facts and figures which will help clarify why there needs to be change in how coding is taught. 

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Naming our Software and Exciting Product Updates

Oct 29, 2018 10:37:19 PM / by Hatch Coding posted in Software, Product Update

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Hi all!

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